Industry Terms


Industry Terms & Commonly Used Slang

Scratching your head over what “kief” is? 

Since many of our learners are newbies in the cannabis industry, you might see confusing words or phrases in the community. Browse our glossary to find a variety of cannabis term definitions and become more educated on industry terminology. 

This glossary will clear up the confusion and get you speaking like a native GC'er in no time! Also, please add new glossary terms if you see anything missing.

Browse the glossary using this index

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B

Butane Hash Oil (or BHO)

A strong concentrate of cannabinoids that is obtained by immersing the cannabis plant in a solvent, normally butane leaving a stick and resinous liquid after the extraction process. It has a high concentration of Tetrahydrocannabinol (or THC) going up to 80% and is also referred to as 'honey oil,' 'earwax' or 'shatter,' depending on the mode of production. Butane hash oil can be smoked, vaporized directly or ingested by mixing it with other edible products.

C

Callus

Tissue made of undifferentiated cells produced by rooting hormones on plant cuttings.

Calyx

Refers to the sepals found in the cannabis flower that is usually covered in resinous trichomes, containing high concentrations of Tetrahydrocannabinol (or THC) and other cannabinoids. In the case of fertilization, the calyxes become the housing structures for the forming seeds. Growers can really benefit by maintaining seedless calyxes as it increases the potency of the resulting buds.

Cambium

Layer of cells which divide and differentiates into xylem and phloem and are responsible for growth.

Cannabaceae

Scientific family to which Cannabis (marijuana) and Humulus (hops) belong.

Cannabichromene (or CBC)

Second most abundant cannabinoid in cannabis, Cannabichromene (or CBC) is considered one of the 'big six' cannabinoids prominent in medical research. It doesn’t get as much attention, but CBC has the same origins as both Tetrahydrocannabinol (or THC) and Cannabidiol (or CBD) do in that they all stem from Cannabigerolic Acid (or CBGA). Cannabis plants produce CBGA, the precursor to three major cannabinoids: Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid (or THCA), Cannabidiolic Acid (or CBDA), and Cannabichromenic Acid (or CBCA).

Cannabidiol (or CBD)

The second-most common cannabinoid (chemical unique to cannabis) found in cannabis, Cannabidiol (or CBD) are the non-psychoactive ingredient of cannabis that is used to treat a number of diseases, including epilepsy and autism. It was almost bred out of cannabis because people were more concerned with getting high off Tetrahydrocannabinol (or THC), but recently it’s been making a comeback for the aforementioned medical reasons. 

Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome (or CHS)

Can occur with cannabis use and is characterized by recurrent nausea, vomiting, and crampy abdominal pain. These symptoms have been reported to be improved temporarily by taking a hot shower or bath, or more fully by stopping the use of cannabis. It is important that Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome be distinguished from other causes of nausea and vomiting, such as cyclic vomiting syndrome

Cannabinoid Profile

Proportional ratio and levels of major cannabinoids found in cannabis being tested. Cannabis testing is the scientific process of measuring different chemicals and compounds in the product. They can measure beneficial constituents like cannabinoids and terpenes, or not-so-desirable contaminants such as pesticides, mold, and residual solvents. Research is now showing that strains exhibit different compound profiles, unique 'fingerprints' built by a specific composition of cannabinoids and terpenes.

Cannabinoid Receptors

Located throughout the body, are part of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in a variety of physiological processes including appetite, pain-sensation, mood, and memory. Cannabinoid receptors are of a class of cell membrane receptors in the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. There are currently two known subtypes of Cannabinoid Receptors, termed CB1 Receptor and CB2 Receptor. The CB1 Receptor is expressed mainly in the brain (Central Nervous System), but also in the lungs, liver, and kidneys. The CB2 Receptor is expressed mainly in the immune system and in hematopoietic cells.

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